Calendar

Text Box: Session schedule
Text Box: Unless otherwise noted, all sessions meet in AP&M B412 at the UCSD campus (click here for maps and directions) run according to the following approximate schedule:

8:30 a.m.

Doors open

8:30 a.m.—9:00 a.m.

Enjoy a complimentary light breakfast (bagels, muffins, fruit, juice, coffee)

9:00 a.m.—9:55 a.m.

Session  1

9:55 a.m.— 10:05 a.m.

Break

10:05 a.m.—11:00 a.m.

Session 2

11:00 a.m.—11:15 a.m.

Wrap-up

Date

Time

Location

Topic

Discussion leader

RSVP

Handouts

10/08/16

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Games and Puzzles

David Patrick

 

Estimathon2016

11/12/16

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Voting and Choice

David Patrick

 

Voting and Choice

12/10/16

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Number Theory and the abc Conjecture

David Patrick

 

Number Theory

(problems and solutions)

01/20/17

8:00—3;15

Marina Village

Greater San Diego Mathematics Council

 

 

 

02/11/17

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Lies, Misinformation, and Deception

David Patrick

 

 

03/18/17

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Wanna bet?

David Patrick

 

 

04/15/17

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M 6402

Knotty puzzles and polynomials

Yana Mohanty

RSVP 04/22/17

 

San Diego

Math Teachers’

Circle

Text Box: Past years’ calendars and handouts are available at the links below.
Text Box: Brief session Descriptions
Text Box: Games and Puzzles								                   October 8, 2016
We'll kick off Year 6 of the San Diego Math Teachers' Circle with a warm-up team game to break the ice and to discover some problem solving strategies. Then, we'll continue to explore problem solving with a collection of math puzzles of various difficulty. The goals are (a) to have fun, (b) to learn some problem solving strategies, and (c) to discuss ways to teach problem solving to students. 
Text Box: Voting and Choice								                 November 12, 2016
Hopefully, the election that occurs 4 days prior to our meeting will have clearly and accurately reflected the choices of the voters. But it's not always so easy to do that. (I'm looking at you, Electoral College!) In fact, if there are more than two options, it's mathematically impossible. We'll discuss this and more, including how to (legally) rig an election and how to be sure that everyone marries their soulmate.
Text Box: Number Theory and the abc Conjecture					      December 10, 2016
Number theory is the study of integers. Common topics include prime numbers, divisors and multiples, modular arithmetic, and Diophantine equations (that is, equations in which we’re looking for integer solutions). We'll discuss many of these topics via a series of fun problems. We'll also talk about the "abc Conjecture", one of the most important unsolved problems in number theory, and discuss the intriguing possible breakthrough that is presently being vigorously debated by some of the world's top mathematicians. 
Text Box: Lies, Misinformation, and Deception					                February 11, 2017
We'll look at a few puzzles in which one of the actors is lying, or is providing misinformation, or is trying to deceive you in some way. Fortunately, with a little mathematical ingenuity, one can get to the truth of the matter. So come and try your luck at Liar's Bingo, or outwit the Byzantine Bettors, or find the hidden mathematical concepts behind a couple of smoke-and-mirrors card tricks. All of these puzzles conceal deeper mathematical truths about information transmission, and of course, in the process of solving these puzzles, we'll explore some useful general problem-solving techniques.
Text Box: Wanna bet?					                					March 18, 2017
We'll talk about some different wagering scenarios: some for money and some for life itself. Suppose you were betting and (legally!) had inside information, but couldn't be sure it was trustworthy, or you knew the game was rigged, but it still isn't a sure thing. Or, suppose a pandemic was on its way, but the vaccine is potentially fatal too. What should you do? 
Text Box: Knotty puzzles and polynomials			       					April 22, 2017
Knot theory is a far reaching subject of current mathematical research whose rudiments can, fortunately, be enjoyed by middle school and high school students. We will learn how to tell knots apart using polynomials and delve into some simple but knotty puzzles. There will be time for some group math silliness in the vein of Rational Tangles (but Rational Tangles is in no way a prerequisite for this session).

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016